Does polyester curtain fabric affect the environment?


Polyester generally has a negative impact on the environment. From production to use to disposal, this fabric has an adverse impact on the environment at every stage of its life cycle.

 

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  Polyester generally has a negative impact on the environment. From production to use to disposal, this fabric has an adverse impact on the environment at every stage of its life cycle.

  In order to obtain the basic materials used in polyester production, it is necessary to obtain fossil fuels, which are limited resources and are also used for important energy and plastic production applications. The process of refining crude oil into petroleum introduces various toxins into the environment, which can damage water and organisms on land.

  After the refinery produces petroleum, further refining processes are needed to produce ethylene used to make polyester. These extraction processes are wasteful, and they introduce more toxins into the environment.

  The process of converting ethylene into polyethylene terephthalate fibers produces more harmful synthetic by-products, and the dyes and treatments used by polyester fabric manufacturers may also enter the surrounding environment and poison the region's ecosystem.

  In addition, the manufacture of polyester usually has significant social and cultural costs. The vast majority of polyester producers in the world are basically engaged in slave labor, and polyester workers are exposed to toxic chemicals, which may cause nervous system damage, cancer or other potentially fatal conditions. Major polyester manufacturing companies are almost always owned by major international companies that enrich themselves while exploiting uneducated people in poor countries.

  As this fabric enters the consumer market, polyester continues to be harmful to the environment. According to a groundbreaking study in 2014, washing polyester fabric by hand or in a washing machine releases tiny synthetic microfibers into the water supply system.

  In terms of microfiber pollution, acrylic fiber is considered the most serious offender, followed by polyester fiber. The microfiber pollution in the water supply harms the health of marine life and also pollutes drinking water around the world.

  Just like they deal with all types of clothing, consumers will inevitably discard their polyester clothing. However, unlike biodegradable fibers such as wool, cotton, or silk, polyester does not degrade naturally in the environment. Although it is impossible to know exactly how long polyester will remain in the earth's ecosystem before it degrades, environmental scientists agree that it may take several centuries for synthetic fibers such as polyester to decompose completely due to natural environmental conditions.

  In general, polyester is harmful to the environment at every stage of its production, and will inevitably accumulate in the world's ecosystem, and there is no feasible removal method. The emergence of plant-based polyester fibers seems to be a step to reverse this unfortunate situation, but it is still unclear whether this petroleum-based PET alternative will cause enough attention in the textile market to have a significant impact on pollution. The influence of polyester. Our website is: https://www.qsf-group.com/product/curtain-fabric/